Welcome to the Department of Neuroscience!

Applications are currently being accepted for the Master’s in Integrative Neuroscience program. Deadline for applications for Fall 2020 is May 15, 2020.

Associated Programs

Featured Stories

Dr. Italo Mocchetti Receiving the President’s Award for Distinguished Scholar-Teacher: October 23, 2019
Ceremony will be held on October 23, 2019 at 5:00 PM in Gaston Hall, during the Fall Faculty Convocation. This award commends faculty who were nominated by their students and faculty peers for outstanding service to our community and to the Academy as exemplary scholar-teachers, embodying Georgetown’s mission as a student-centered research University.

Kathleen Maguire-Zeiss Named New Chair of Department of Neuroscience
As newly named chair of the Department of Neuroscience, Kathy Maguire-Zeiss, PhD, will help lead the initiative to grow Georgetown’s neuroscience research.

MS in Integrative Neuroscience
The Department of Neuroscience offers a rigorous program leading to the MS degree in Integrative Neuroscience. The MS program is designed for completion in two full-time consecutive semesters. The curriculum includes an extensive integrated overview of neuroscience, statistics, experimental design, and technical approaches.

Bayer Extols the Virtues of “Showing Up and Doing Your Job”
From her formative years as a self-described “Army brat” and a first-generation college graduate, Barbara M. Bayer, PhD, has focused on showing up and doing her job.

Alzheimer’s Risk Genes Linked to Changes in Young, Healthy Brains
Conventional wisdom might indicate that bigger brains and enhanced memory performance in youth should help protect against the cognitive declines seen decades later in Alzheimer’s disease. Yet for two Georgetown University scientists, recent research appears to suggest the opposite.

Boys with High-Functioning Autism Show Surprising Strength at Language
“We had not expected this interesting finding,” says Michael Ullman, director of the Brain and Language Laboratory at Georgetown University Medical Center and senior author of the study that found boys with high-functioning autism could process a key grammar task faster than boys without autism.

Upcoming events